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Silicon Valley Hair Institute New Post on Costs

Silicon Valley Hair Institute

Silicon Valley Hair Institute, the Bay Area Leader in Hair Transplantation, Announces Ad Campaign Focused on Cost of Hair Restoration

Silicon Valley Hair Institute, a professional hair restoration clinic in the San Francisco Bay Area, is proud to announce a new ad campaign focused on the touch points of the cost of hair transplantation in the Bay Area.

“Many times people can equate quality to price. For consumer goods like water bottles or jeans, it might not be a big deal.

If someone needs robotic hair transplantation, it’s important to do a bit more research,” explained Miguel Canales, founder of Silicon Valley Hair Institute. “Our new ad campaign explains why it’s important to verify that cost equals quality instead of just overhead.”

Details concerning the cost of robotic transplantation and the importance of verifying quality can be reviewed at the following page: http://siliconvalleyhairinstitute.com.

A new blog post on the topic of cost and quality can be viewed at http://siliconvalleyhairinstitute.com/hair-transplant-cost/.

Silicon Valley Hair Institute, a top hair loss clinic in the San Francisco Bay Area, has announced a new campaign focused on user interest in the cost of hair transplantation. The new ads explain affordability options for savvy Bay Area consumers with a focus on quality as well as cost.

Miguel Canales, Founder of Silicon Valley Hair Institute

Ads can be viewed on Google and Bing for searches such as “cost of hair transplantation in the Bay Area.” Bay Area residents searching for high-quality surgery for hair loss may be interested to know the most expensive, or the cheapest, clinic may not always provide the best results.

A better option is to reach out for a private consultation with a hair transplant specialist, such as Dr. Canales, who can provide evidence-based recommendations that fit an individual’s needs and budget.

 QUALITY VS. COST IN NEW ADS ON COST OF HAIR TRANSPLANTATION

Here is background on this release. Residents may not realize quality and price do not always match. A medical clinic offering low-cost eye surgery may actually provide a top-quality experience. Equally, a clinic offering the same may bring unacceptable results.

Further research may be required to ensure quality is of the utmost importance to any clinic. The scenario can also be applied to the cost of robotic hair transplantation.

a world leader in Hair Transplant technology, Hair Restoration surgery and Hair Transplant clinical research as well as inventing ARTAS® Robotic Hair Transplant technologies
Many Bay Area residents may believe the cost of a service is equal to the quality. Luxury goods including automobiles and Swiss watches can give the illusion all high-quality products can be expensive. It may be true in some instances, but not in all.

A trendy purse can be costly, but not hold the value of the price tag as time goes by. A $10 water bottle may keep water just as cold as a $50 name-brand bottle. Each situation might be different and require more than the review of a price tag.

If a Bay Area resident chooses to check the cost of robotic hair transplantation, it can require more than a quick price check. Leaning in and learning more can help make a better choice.  Hair loss treatments can vary and the best hair restoration clinic in the Bay Area may not cost as much as one would think.

Silicon Valley Hair Institute, led by a clinical authority on hair transplantation Dr. Miguel Canales, has announced a new ad campaign. Expensive hair loss treatments may not always be the right answer to a thinning scalp. The cost of robotic hair transplantation can be affordable and high quality.

Bay Area hair clinics can invest resources into different line items. If a clinic invests too much on overhead and advertising, managers may skimp on important hair therapy technology. Researching the quality of technology and service may be just as important as considering the cost of robotic hair transplantation. A smart move by Bay Area residents may be to start by scheduling a zero-cost hair transplant consultation.

ABOUT SILICON VALLEY HAIR INSTITUTE

Silicon Valley Hair Institute, under the leadership of top-rated California hair transplant surgeon Miguel Canales, MD, is one of the best facilities offering San Francisco Bay Area hair transplants.

Dr. Canales provides the full range of advanced hair transplant and hair restoration procedures for Bay Area residents, from San Francisco to San Mateo to Palo Alto. If one needs a hair transplant specialist, look no further than this Bay Area hair transplant center.

Dr. Canales also performs female hair transplants for women and eyebrow restorahair transplanttion, thus offering the best hair transplant and robotic hair replacement options. Persons interested in the cost of robotic hair transplantation can visit http://siliconvalleyhairinstitute.com/.

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Atlanta Hair Restoration Center Wins "Best of 2017

Hair transplant robot company going public

4 things to know about the hair transplant robot company going public

As more men desire a full head of hair, a robotics hair-transplant company is seeking to capitalize on that insecurity.

Restoration Robotics filed to go public with a price range of $7 to $9 a share, which would give the company a valuation of up to $25 million. By selling 3.12 million shares of stock, the company would raise up to $28 million.

The company has applied to list on the Nasdaq Global Market under the symbol “HAIR.”

National Securities Corp. is the lead underwriter on the offering. The underwriters have the option of selling an additional 468,750 additional shares.

Here’s what to know before the company goes public:

The market opportunity

Restoration Robotics believes it’s poised to bring in more revenue, thanks to an aging population that has money to spend and that population’s growing acceptance of surgery for aesthetic reasons. Men, in particular, appear to have a growing acceptance of the practice, with the number of vanity procedures increasing 325% since 1997, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery.

The acceptance, of course, comes partly out of need, as about 35 million men in the U.S. have male pattern baldness, according to the prospectus.

All told, Americans spent more than $15 billion on aesthetic procedures in 2016, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery.

transplant robot company going publicOne problem

While balding men and women may desire a robotic helping hand, the ARTAS system is only cleared by the FDA to market to men who have black or brown straight hair.

Overall, the machine is meant to assist a physician during some of the more difficult parts of hair-transplant surgery — the dissection of hair follicles and planning where to put the new hair follicles.

Later on, Restoration Robotics will be seeking FDA approval to market its systems to women, patients with curly hair and hair that is not black or brown. It also hopes to expand beyond just follical dissection.

The company had sold 89 ARTAS Systems in the U.S. and 144 outside of the country as of June 2017.

The money

Restoration Robotics brought in net revenue of $15.6 million in 2016, down from $17.2 million in 2015. The company also pared down its net loss to $21.8 million in 2016 from $23 million in 2015. The company had a deficit of $156.8 million as of June 2017.

The company began in 2002, but did not begin commercial sales of its product in the U.S. until 2011. Restoration Robotics said it has never been profitable.

Why their auditors are concerned

The auditors said they have prepared the company’s financial statements “on a going concern basis” given the company’s accumulated debt and the fact that the company does not have enough money for its current operations.

“These factors raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern,” the auditors wrote in an explanatory note in the prospectus.

Though Restoration Robotics expects to raise money through its initial public offering and has raised more money by issuing Series C convertible stock, the auditors say that may not be enough to satisfy its obligations due Dec. 31, 2017.

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4 things to know about the hair transplant robot company going public